Your Garden in September

 Field Manager, Bryan Stuart

Field Manager, Bryan Stuart

The days are growing shorter, the angle of the sun is waning, and school is back in session....it’s September!

This is a busy time of year at Seed Savers Exchange.  Here in Zone 4b there is much work to be done as we begin to wrap up the growing season.  Frost typically hits during the first week of October, and during September the name of the game is harvesting, seed saving, and prepping beds for next year.

Here are the top five tips from Seed Savers Exchange Field Manager, Bryan Stuart on what to focus on during the busy month of September, no matter where you live.

  Staff weeds dill late in the growing season at Seed Savers Exchange.

Staff weeds dill late in the growing season at Seed Savers Exchange.

  1. Clear and compost debris from plants that are finished.  Cleaning your vegetable garden will not only help keep things tidy over winter, it also increases air circulation around crops that may still be producing an help avoid disease now and in the future.  Plant cover crops in areas of the garden that are finished for the season.

  2. Keep weeding.  This time of year many weeds are going to seed (just ask any allergy sufferer) and ridding them from your garden will prevent self-seeding and returning next season.

  3. Prep space that will be used for fall planting.  Fall is a great time to plant garlic and other bulbs for spring.

  4. Harvest, preserve, repeat.  September can be a labor intensive time as fruits and vegetables are mature. Help extend your growing season by a few weeks covering your crops with blankets in the case of light frost.  

  5. Dream of next year.  Now is time to record notes of what went well, and what didn’t, while your memory is fresh.  This will be helpful when you are ready to plan next year's garden.
  Visit    our learn section    for more tips and resources on gardening and seed saving.

Visit our learn section for more tips and resources on gardening and seed saving.

Whether you are prepping for fall planting or tucking things to bed for winter, here are a few trusted sources for your September to do list in the garden: